Archive | September 2013

Blue is the New Pink

Guest Post by Oliver Bogler

“When I grow up I’m going to be a photographer.” That’s what I used to tell my kids, when they were at the age when saying it seemed to be enough to get you there. Now I’d add: “… a photographer like David Jay.” And by that I mean successfull, visionary and socially engaged.

I’m not kidding anyone of course, least of all my children. First of all, I’m never growing up! And secondly, I’m in my late 40s, enjoy my career in cancer research enormously and frankly lack the talent required for art. But photography is a passion of mine, mostly as someone who loves the art form and a little as someone who takes pictures. When I go to art museums I head straight for the photography section, and when I travel the world I often seek out photography above all other sites to see.

So following my diagnosis with breast cancer in September of 2012 I began to become interested in the intersection between this disease and photography. To say that there are a lot of breast cancer images out there, is an understatement in the age of digital photography, and much of it is in the vein of pink. In this landscape the SCAR Project stands out as a beacon of frank art. The first time you see it, it hits you. And that is saying something in an age when visual impact has become significantly blunted by the sheer volume and ever increasing shock value of the media that saturates our culture.

The SCAR Project portraits have an honesty and simplicity that create a connection between the viewer and the subject. The images of young women, bearing scars, are compelling, and draw you in to try and understand their loss and what it means to them. They are also beautifully made photographs, by an artist with a sure eye. The Project has evident integrity. And its goal, to raise awareness that young women do get breast cancer, that the disease does not respect age, is important. Wherever the images appear they accomplish their goal.

In the Fall of 2012, from my freshly diagnosed perspective, the one thing I thought that was missing in the SCAR Project was men. Just as David says “breast cancer is not a pink ribbon”, I say “breast cancer is not a women’s cancer”.

Oliver

Oliver’s SCAR Portrait

One in every hundred people with breast cancer is a man. Sure that is a pretty small number, but it is not zero. And men are another segment of the breast cancer world where raising awareness is still urgently needed. Men routinely ignore their symptoms, and are diagnosed later with poorer outcomes because of denial and ignorance.

I am still a little stunned that David agreed to consider men as subjects for his work, and has started a connected body of work, the SCAR Project: male breast cancer. Stunned and deeply grateful. This new work focuses on men of all ages, and they are mostly older than the women in the SCAR Project. That’s because men with this disease are older, and because the goal is to raise awareness for all men. Amongst women, the focus is on younger women, where awareness also lags behind. This male breast cancer work is still in its early stages and I am excited about its future.

As a result of our discussions around men with breast cancer, I was lucky to become acquainted with David and the SCAR Project team, and the idea of bringing the work to Houston was born. Susan Rafte of the Pink Ribbons Project came aboard early, and her foundation which works at the interface of art and breast cancer is the sponsor that is making it happen. Gremillion & Co. Fine Arts generously offered their gallery space for the exhibit. And Kathy Hathorn and American Art Resources are supporting the project too, both by connecting us all and by providing resources to get the pieces hung in the gallery. Now a large team of volunteers is helping make 10 days of viewing and events a reality. In October the SCAR Project will be in Houston for 10 days of exhibits, expert talks from doctors and survivors, chances to meet some of the women photgraphed in the Project, and to hear David talk about the work. There is also a showing of the award winning documentary about the SCAR Project, called Baring it All, at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Please join us. Details of the activities are HERE.

[About Oliver: Dr. Bogler studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge University graduating in 1988, and then completed his PhD at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University College Branch in London, in 1991. Following a post-doc at the Salk Institute in Developmental Neurobiology, he rejoined the Ludwig Institute, at its San Diego Branch. His first faculty appointment in 1997 was in the Departments of Anatomy and Neurosurgery at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. In 2000 he moved to the Hermelin Brain Tumor Center, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2002. In 2005 Dr. Bogler joined the Department of Neurosurgery and the Brain Tumor Center at the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center as Director of Basic Research, and was promoted to Professor in 2009. His research was focused on EGFR signaling in glioma and novel platinum compounds. In July 2010 Dr. Bogler accepted the position of Vice President for Global Academic Programs where he manages academic relationships spanning over 30 Sister Institutions in 20 countries on behalf of MD Anderson. In September 2011 he was also appointed Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, and now focuses on overseeing the 300 people organized into 16 departments in this division, who deliver support for the more than 5,000 academic personnel at MD Anderson and are the stewards of our education mission. He is married to Irene Newsham, PhD, a cancer biologist also working at MD Anderson, and they have two children, aged 10 and 11.]

Follow Oliver’s blog HERE.

The SCAR Project Houston Exhibition Press Release

THE SCAR PROJECT: BREAST CANCER IS NOT A PINK RIBBON

TO PREMIERE IN HOUSTON, TEXAS OCTOBER 17-28, 2013

Houston, Texas—September 23, 2013—The groundbreaking photographic exhibition shot by fashion photographer David Jay is set to premiere at Gremillion & Co. Fine Arts Gallery, 2501 Sunset Blvd., Houston, TX 77005: The SCAR Project: Breast Cancer Is Not A Pink Ribbon.

The SCAR Project is a series of large scale portraits of young breast cancer survivors shot by fashion photographer David Jay. The SCAR Project is an exercise in awareness, hope, reflection and healing. Presented primarily as an awareness raising campaign for young women, The SCAR Project’s deeper message is one of humanity. Ultimately, The SCAR Project is not about breast cancer, but the human condition itself; the images transcending the disease, illuminating the scars that unite us all.

The exhibition opens October 17, 2013 with a special evening reception hosted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Invitation required. For information, please contact: events@mdanderson.org. The gallery will be open for public viewing of the exhibition October 18-28 (closed Sunday and Monday). Gallery hours are 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. Admission is free. Scheduled events: TBA. A screening of the EMMY Award winning documentary about The SCAR Project: Baring It All will be shown at the Museum of Fine Arts on Monday, October 21. A detailed listing of the Houston exhibition schedule of events, with links to R.S.V.P. is available via The SCAR Project’s Exhibition Page.

Contact: Dr. Oliver Bogler, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at MD Anderson, email: obogler@mdanderson.org and Susan Rafte, Pink Ribbons co-founder, email: susan@pinkribbons.org.

Sponsored by: The Pink Ribbons Project (www.pinkrobbons.org).

Special thanks to Gremillion Gallery for donating the space and a special thanks to Kathy Hathorn.

For more information on The SCAR Project visit the website: www.thescarproject.org and www.thescarprojectblog.com. Follow @thescarproject on Twitter and Facebook.

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Force

[When I stood before my guest blogger ‘s SCAR portrait at the first SCAR Project Exhibition in NYC in 2010, it was the first time I really faced another  woman whose [Surviving Cancer.] [Absolute Reality.]  looked like mine. I knew so little about breast cancer when I was diagnosed in 2008, that I didn’t  know that no reconstruction was even an option any woman ever opted for. The one woman I knew who’d had a double mastectomy, did it prophylactically with immediate reconstruction. In my case there weren’t really options. The best course of action was to wait until after surgery and chemo, to evaluate the reconstruction question: 2B or not 2B?   When I  met Toni at the Cincinnati Exhibition I produced in 2011,  she was still the only other woman I knew who had been there, done that, had to buy a flat new t-shirt like me. I was eager to learn her story, and to share it here.  Now, especially in light of the recent Facebook controversy over SCAR images, and of upcoming exhibition news, I’ve asked my flat and fabulous SCAR sister Toni G. to share her SCAR story. As The SCAR Project exhibition will be premiering in Texas this fall, it seemed fitting to lead up to that with the story of the Lone Star SCAR girl. As she is a science teacher, Part I dealt with the Gravity of cancer. Part II is likewise aptly titled Force.]

Guest Post by SCAR girl Toni G.

After being diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer at 28 years old, I found my life moving down a new path, even as the geography of my body was being redefined. My dream of being a scientist and having my own lab was no longer a priority like it was in my before cancer days. Being alive, and enjoying life, was. Being a positive force despite the cancer, was too.

In the days and weeks that followed my diagnosis I felt lost. There was an abundance of breast cancer information out there but only a fraction of it was relevant to my situation. I tried to find information from other twenty-somethings fighting cancer while still finishing their degrees. And still dating. And without children. Cancer was forcing me to make some of the most difficult decisions of my life. Sifting through the mountains of information to find the right answers for me felt isolating, was time consuming and emotionally exhausting: Erosion.

One decision was what to do with the breasts that were trying to kill me. I knew without a doubt they had to go, but what would I put in their place? After meeting with a plastic surgeon I knew my reconstruction options on paper, but one size doesnʼt fit all. At the time, I knew I wanted breasts, but I couldnʼt picture what my new breasts would, or could, look like. Expanders? Implants? With or without transplanted belly/back/butt tissue? Another twelve inches of scars on my body? Tattooed nipples? I tried to find pictures online to help make this decision, but there were surprisingly few resources available showing real post-mastectomy pictures. Especially in younger women.

One day on the Komen message board a photographer named David Jay posted that he was looking for young breast cancer survivors to participate in “The S.C.A.R. Project: Surviving Cancer, Absolute Reality”. After an inquiry he told me he wanted to portray through photography the cancer experience by showing the visible scars that are symbolic for so many women. He wanted to show the world exactly what I had been looking for. I immediately knew I had to be a part of this unique awareness project. To help other young women who are feeling lost, facing the same reality. To be a positive force.

David and I decided to do a series of portraits….before and after my bilateral mastectomy as well as after reconstruction. In 2007 I flew to New York City with my sister just months before my surgery to do the “before” shot. A year later, after my double mastectomy I flew back to NYC with my father and took the “after surgery” shot. This picture shows my reality: burned from radiation, scars where my breasts used to be and those million dollar chemo curls. These are a few of the symbols in my SCAR portrait. And my sheer determination.

Toni G

Part of my cancer battle plan involved a clinical trial where I had high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. With my immune system wiped out I was told reconstruction was going to have to wait a year due to a high risk of infection. A year of contemplating (and stressing over) reconstruction options passed. Then, in the short window of opportunity I had to have the reconstruction surgery, I was offered a chance to visit Peace Corps friends in Mozambique. Reconstruction was going to have to wait some more; I chose Mozambique.

Another year went by and I was still breastless. But by then I knew of other survivors, struggling with pain, necrosis, rejection, infection and many other complications that go along with trying to rebuild a part of your body from unnatural parts. The idea that reconstruction was the only way to go was starting to fade.

The SCAR Project evolved and in October 2010 I returned to NYC with all four of my siblings to attend the SCAR Project exhibition.

Toni G. and sibs NYC

I remember walking up to the gallery and seeing the portraits that had become so familiar to me; I’d only looked at them a million times before that night. I felt an instant bond with my SCAR sisters. We shared our stories. We all had similar questions about life after cancer and it was comforting to put bits and pieces of the puzzle together. Especially since we were assembling it without knowing what the final picture looked like.

I didn’t know at the time the impact The SCAR Project would have on me, let alone the cancer community and beyond. I hoped it would change the way people viewed the reality of breast cancer. I hoped it would give women strength to know there is life after cancer, even if it is filled with jagged scars and a valley of doubt. I wanted to be one of those pictures that women could look at and relate. I wanted to be an answer that someone else was looking for.

My hopes for the SCAR Project continue to come true as the exhibit travels, and more and more people find out about it and are inspired by it. It is the powerful force I hoped it would be. And I am so proud to be a part of it.

In addition to NYC I’ve also attended the Cincinnati and Birmingham exhibitions. I’m thrilled it’s coming to Houston this October. Even more thrilled that MD Anderson, the place that played an instrumental role in saving my life, is hosting the opening night.

As far as that “after reconstruction” shot David and I were going to do? Well, I canʼt pinpoint the moment I made the decision not to have reconstruction, but it happened sometime in those years of waiting to have it. It’s such a paradigm shift to have been so gradual. I don’t think I ever really thought of no reconstruction as an option. Our society is infatuated with breasts. “Every man’s a breast man” and 1 woman = 2 breasts…not one or none.

My SCAR sisters have shown me, both directly and indirectly, that I donʼt have to have reconstruction. They encourage me to embrace the new me and to live flat and fabulous like countless other women. And two of my lovely SCAR sisters, Sara and Barbie, have started a Flat & Fabulous Facebook support group for women who’ve chosen against having reconstruction. I continue to find comfort in communicating with women who have walked in my shoes. That finding other women who have walked in similar shoes was so very difficult is the very reason the world needs The SCAR Project. I needed the SCAR Project. And I know I’m not alone.